Welcome to the Alaska Historical Society

PCG-Organization-Icon.pngThe Alaska Historical Society (AHS) is a non-profit, volunteer-based organization dedicated to the promotion of Alaska history by the exchange of ideas and information, the preservation and interpretation of resources, and the education of Alaskans about their heritage. Governed by a 15-member board, the Society provides a forum and a vehicle to achieve these goals. AHS is a membership organization with 430+ members. If you would like to join us, visit our membership page.

 


Recent Blog Entries

Spruce Root Basketry at Anchorage Museum – Thursday, November 6

Date Posted: October 31, 2014       Categories: News

Join Tlingit artist Teri Rofkar and Anchorage Museum Conservator Sarah Owens as they discuss spruce root basketry on Thursday, November 6, at 7:00 p.m. Rofkar and Owens will talk about collaborative projects where they investigated and reverse-engineered the use of this locally-harvested, raw material. Rofkar is a master weaver and has researched Tlingit basketry in museums […]

Canned Salmon in Your Local Grocery – Prize Winners!

Date Posted: October 29, 2014       Categories: 49 History

From time to time in the heyday of canned salmon, say about 1900 to 1960, the packers would sponsor contests to generate interest and boost sales. Recipe contests proved especially popular among consumers, and by requiring entrants to submit their handwritten salmon recipes on the reverse sides of labels the packers developed a rudimentary method […]

The History of Canned Salmon…right there on the label

Date Posted: October 23, 2014       Categories: Alaska's Historic Canneries

by Ross Coen In addition to being works of art in their own right, canned salmon labels are unique historical artifacts. They can tell us which canneries operated where and when. They point to the marketing strategies used by the packers to attract consumers in different eras. And, as the Oona label below illustrates, they […]

Rare Arctic Map Acquired by UAF Rasmuson Library

Date Posted: October 18, 2014       Categories: 49 History

by Kathy Arndt The Alaska and Polar Regions Collections and Archives, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks is excited to unveil one of the newest additions to their Rare Maps Collection. The map is titled “The Arctic Regions with the Tracks of Search Parties and the Progress of Discovery Compiled from the Latest […]

Fairbanks Event: Alaska Commercial Company Records Lecture, October 28, 2014

Date Posted: October 16, 2014       Categories: News

Katherine Arndt, Alaska and Polar Regions Bibliographer at Rasmuson Library will explore the research potential of one of the largest collections of business records in the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives. Spanning the years 1868–1913, the Alaska Commercial Company Records document one company’s efforts to remain profitable in an economy that was shifting its focus from furs to fish and gold. WHEN: […]

Spruce Root Basketry at Anchorage Museum – Thursday, November 6

Date Posted: October 31, 2014       Categories: News

Join Tlingit artist Teri Rofkar and Anchorage Museum Conservator Sarah Owens as they discuss spruce root basketry on Thursday, November 6, at 7:00 p.m. Rofkar and Owens will talk about collaborative projects where they investigated and reverse-engineered the use of this locally-harvested, raw material. Rofkar is a master weaver and has researched Tlingit basketry in museums […]


Canned Salmon in Your Local Grocery – Prize Winners!

Date Posted: October 29, 2014       Categories: 49 History

From time to time in the heyday of canned salmon, say about 1900 to 1960, the packers would sponsor contests to generate interest and boost sales. Recipe contests proved especially popular among consumers, and by requiring entrants to submit their handwritten salmon recipes on the reverse sides of labels the packers developed a rudimentary method […]


The History of Canned Salmon…right there on the label

Date Posted: October 23, 2014       Categories: Alaska's Historic Canneries

by Ross Coen In addition to being works of art in their own right, canned salmon labels are unique historical artifacts. They can tell us which canneries operated where and when. They point to the marketing strategies used by the packers to attract consumers in different eras. And, as the Oona label below illustrates, they […]


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